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BVT News Roundup 16 January 2014.

(via Stupid24.com)

Morning News Read 18 October 2013.

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(Very very late) Weekend News Read 28 September 2013.

(Photo: Ramin Talaie / Getty Images via Slate.com)

Morning News Read, Monday 26 August 2013

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(Photo of inmate firefighters on Highway 120 on Sunday as the Rim Fire burned on the northwest edge of Yosemite National Park by Jae C. Hong / AP via The New York Times)

Weekend News Read Sunday 25 August 2013

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(Photo: Richard Drew / AP via the New York Daily News)

Weekend News Read 24 August 2013

Morning News Read 23 August 2013.

Mayer fire department chaplain Rev. Bob Ossler reacts during a memorial service for the 19 wilderness firefighters who were killed on Sunday when when an out-of-control blaze overtook the elite group near Yarnell, Arizona.  (Photo: AP via The Telegraph)

Mayer fire department chaplain Rev. Bob Ossler reacts during a memorial service for the 19 wilderness firefighters who were killed on Sunday when when an out-of-control blaze overtook the elite group near Yarnell, Arizona.  (Photo: AP via The Telegraph)

Why The Heroic Work of Hotshot Crews Isn’t Getting Any Easier

wwnorton:

For “Fire”, the lead essay in his 2001 book of the same name, Sebastian Junger interviewed many hotshot crews and even joined the ranks of one crew out of Oregon to learn about their jobs on the front lines of fighting forest fires: 

Many hotshots I spoke with attributed the increasing danger of their job to severe drought conditions in the northern Rockies, as well as to decades of rigorous fire suppression. Both have contributed to a huge buildup of dead fuel in our nation’s forests—fuel that ordinarily would have been cleared out by the small fires that regularly flare up in an unmanaged ecosystem. 

Later in the essay, Junger describes the hotshot camp routine while on the line:

[Spike camps] are established in a roadless area and supplied by helicopter with food, tools, and paper sleeping bags. According to Forest Service policy, hotshots should not be spiked out for more than two days in a row. One level less comfortable than a spike camp is a coyote camp, and hotshots are not universal in their love of coyote camps. Coyoteing, as its called, means dropping in exhaustion wherever you happen to be when it gets dark. Because hotshots have only their line packs when they fight fire, they are usually caught without food, sleeping bags, or extra clothes.