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allisonunsupervised:

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mildhorror:

Here’s the link for more information about the PS244 fundraising campaign

Here’s the link to the GIVE IT ALL TO ME Library Collection at OutofPrintClothing.com.

Check it out! The good folks dropped me a line about this project last week, and I’m happy to boost for Library Week.

Signal boost

So hey, #education…

I love these.  Love them.  And for a great cause.

A candlelight vigil was held in front of the building called 5Pointz — an outline of which is somewhat visible through a fresh coat of white paint — in Queens on Tuesday evening.  The property’s owner, which will convert the street art mecca into residential buildings, had the graffiti-coated exterior whitewashed because watching the structure being demolished would have otherwise been “torture.”  (Photo: Todd Heisler / The New York Times)

A candlelight vigil was held in front of the building called 5Pointz — an outline of which is somewhat visible through a fresh coat of white paint — in Queens on Tuesday evening.  The property’s owner, which will convert the street art mecca into residential buildings, had the graffiti-coated exterior whitewashed because watching the structure being demolished would have otherwise been “torture.”  (Photo: Todd Heisler / The New York Times)

“Heartbreaking. This is not just about graffiti — it’s about the unity of people who met here from all over the world. That’s what really hurts.”

"JUST,"  a street artist, commenting on the whitewashing of 5Pointz, a graffiti-covered building in Long Island City, Queens; the owner, which will demolish the structure to make way for residential buildings, had the artwork painted over during the evening and early morning hours to avoid drawing attention.

(via the New York Times)

AT ARMS  U.S. Navy Seabee EOCN Courtney McCormack grabs an armful of debris from a home in Breezy Point, Queens, a community ravaged by superstorm Sandy. McCormack was one member of a Navy battalion that descended on the neighborhood on Veteran’s Day.  (Photo: John Makely / NBC News)

AT ARMS  U.S. Navy Seabee EOCN Courtney McCormack grabs an armful of debris from a home in Breezy Point, Queens, a community ravaged by superstorm Sandy. McCormack was one member of a Navy battalion that descended on the neighborhood on Veteran’s Day.  (Photo: John Makely / NBC News)

From the New York Daily News, the devastation wrought by Sandy and the subsequent lawlessness gripping one New York City neighborhood: 

When night falls in the Rockaways, the hoods come out. Ever since Sandy strafed the Queens peninsula and tore up the boardwalk, it’s become an often lawless place where cops are even scarcer than electrical power and food. 
Locals say they are arming themselves with guns, baseball bats, booby traps — even a bow and arrow — to defend against looters. 
Thugs have been masquerading as Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) workers, knocking on doors in the dead of night. But locals say the real workers have been nowhere in sight, causing at least one elected official — who fears a descent into anarchy if help doesn’t arrive soon — to call for the city to investigate the utility. 
Further exacerbating desperate conditions, it could take at least a month to repair the the bridge that connects the Rockaways to the city subway system, officials said. 
“We booby-trapped our door and keep a baseball bat beside our bed,” said Danielle Harris, 34, rummaging through donated supplies as children rode scooters along half-block chunk of the boardwalk that had marooned into the middle of Beach 91st St. “We heard gunshots for three nights in a row,” said Harris, who believed they came from the nearby housing projects.
… Gunshots and slow-rolling cars have become a common fixture of the night since Hurricane Sandy.
“I would take a looter with a bow. If I felt threatened I would definitely use it,” said Keone Singlehurst, 42 (pictured above). “Its like the Wild West. A borderline lawless situation.”

(Photo: Mark Morales / NYDN)

From the New York Daily News, the devastation wrought by Sandy and the subsequent lawlessness gripping one New York City neighborhood:

When night falls in the Rockaways, the hoods come out. Ever since Sandy strafed the Queens peninsula and tore up the boardwalk, it’s become an often lawless place where cops are even scarcer than electrical power and food.

Locals say they are arming themselves with guns, baseball bats, booby traps — even a bow and arrow — to defend against looters.

Thugs have been masquerading as Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) workers, knocking on doors in the dead of night. But locals say the real workers have been nowhere in sight, causing at least one elected official — who fears a descent into anarchy if help doesn’t arrive soon — to call for the city to investigate the utility.

Further exacerbating desperate conditions, it could take at least a month to repair the the bridge that connects the Rockaways to the city subway system, officials said.

“We booby-trapped our door and keep a baseball bat beside our bed,” said Danielle Harris, 34, rummaging through donated supplies as children rode scooters along half-block chunk of the boardwalk that had marooned into the middle of Beach 91st St. “We heard gunshots for three nights in a row,” said Harris, who believed they came from the nearby housing projects.

… Gunshots and slow-rolling cars have become a common fixture of the night since Hurricane Sandy.

“I would take a looter with a bow. If I felt threatened I would definitely use it,” said Keone Singlehurst, 42 (pictured above). “Its like the Wild West. A borderline lawless situation.”

(Photo: Mark Morales / NYDN)

Fletcher Harris, of Rockaway Park, warms himself by a flaming oil barrel on 118th Street, October 31st. Parts of New York City outside Manhattan, including Staten Island, Coney Island in Brooklyn and The Rockaways in Queens, were completely devastated by superstorm Sandy, destroying homes, businesses and knocking gas stations offline. “No one knows we’re here,” one Coney Island resident told a reporter from WCBS 880, a local news radio station. (Photo: Adrian Fussell / Reportage by Getty Images via The New Yorker)

Fletcher Harris, of Rockaway Park, warms himself by a flaming oil barrel on 118th Street, October 31st. Parts of New York City outside Manhattan, including Staten Island, Coney Island in Brooklyn and The Rockaways in Queens, were completely devastated by superstorm Sandy, destroying homes, businesses and knocking gas stations offline. “No one knows we’re here,” one Coney Island resident told a reporter from WCBS 880, a local news radio station. (Photo: Adrian Fussell / Reportage by Getty Images via The New Yorker)

INFERNAL  People walked by homes burned down in the Breezy Point section of Queens, NY.  More than 110 homes were destroyed, with another two dozen severely damaged, after fire broke out late Monday evening — the night Hurricane Sandy made landfall.  Firefighters were unable to make their way through flooded streets as a storm surge also struck the neighborhood.  (Photo: Mario Tama / Getty Images via The New York Times)

INFERNAL  People walked by homes burned down in the Breezy Point section of Queens, NY.  More than 110 homes were destroyed, with another two dozen severely damaged, after fire broke out late Monday evening — the night Hurricane Sandy made landfall.  Firefighters were unable to make their way through flooded streets as a storm surge also struck the neighborhood.  (Photo: Mario Tama / Getty Images via The New York Times)

NY1 NEWS: New York City struck by two tornadoes on Thursday - one in Brooklyn and the other in Queens »

Weather officials confirmed tonight that two tornadoes touched down in New York City yesterday, as residents citywide continue to clean up damage and local lawmakers build their case for FEMA funding.

The National Weather Service said that the first tornado touched down in Park Slope, Brooklyn with winds of 80 mph after 5 p.m. Thursday and traveled two miles northeast.

The second tornado touched down about two-and-a-half miles south of Flushing, Queens and traveled north to Bayside with winds of up to 100 mph, before lifting over the waters. Middle Village and Forest Hills, Queens were the neighborhoods hit hardest.

The National Weather Service, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Office of Emergency Management conducted flyovers and land surveys in Staten Island, Brooklyn and Queens before coming to its conclusions.

The Bronx had a tornado earlier this year and Brooklyn had a tornado back in 2007.

Residents surveyed the damage along Utopia Parkway in Queens, where multiple trees down and wires were knocked down by the storm.  At least one person was killed.  (Photo: Theodorakis / New York Daily News)

Residents surveyed the damage along Utopia Parkway in Queens, where multiple trees down and wires were knocked down by the storm.  At least one person was killed.  (Photo: Theodorakis / New York Daily News)