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NEW KIDS BY THE DOCK   A new species of dolphin, Tursiops Australis, is seen in Victoria’s Port Phillip Bay,  Australia.  The new species, which can also be found in Australia’s Gippsland Lake, have a small population of 150 and were originally  thought to be one of the two existing bottlenose dolphin species.  (Photo: Monash University / EPA via the Telegraph)

NEW KIDS BY THE DOCK   A new species of dolphin, Tursiops Australis, is seen in Victoria’s Port Phillip Bay, Australia.  The new species, which can also be found in Australia’s Gippsland Lake, have a small population of 150 and were originally thought to be one of the two existing bottlenose dolphin species.  (Photo: Monash University / EPA via the Telegraph)

I CAN BE YOUR WHALE-O   A Beluga whale has become a sensation at the Shimane aquarium in Japan after learning how to blow halo-shaped bubbles.  (Photo: Hiroya Minakuchi Minden / Solent News via the Telegraph)

I CAN BE YOUR WHALE-O   A Beluga whale has become a sensation at the Shimane aquarium in Japan after learning how to blow halo-shaped bubbles.  (Photo: Hiroya Minakuchi Minden / Solent News via the Telegraph)

SHE WHO NOSE   A seal sleeps with its nose sticking out of the water at the aquarium at the zoo in Duisburg, western Germany.  (Photo: AFP-Getty via the Telegraph)

SHE WHO NOSE   A seal sleeps with its nose sticking out of the water at the aquarium at the zoo in Duisburg, western Germany.  (Photo: AFP-Getty via the Telegraph)

WATER CANNON   A dolphin bursts from the sea and flies like a bullet straight at the camera in the Chanonry Narrows, Moray Firth, Scotland.  (Photo: Tim Stenton / Barcroft Media via the Telegraph)

WATER CANNON   A dolphin bursts from the sea and flies like a bullet straight at the camera in the Chanonry Narrows, Moray Firth, Scotland.  (Photo: Tim Stenton / Barcroft Media via the Telegraph)

New York City’s residents are again yelling “There be whales here… and seals and dolphins!”  From the Daily News:

Whales, dolphins and seals have made a triumphant return to the waters just outside New York Harbor - and the comeback has even sparked whale and seal-watching tours.
Tom Paladino, captain of two ferry boats from the Rockaways, says pods of aquatic mammals off the city’s coast have “increased tenfold.”
"We used to see 10 whales a year - now we see 100," he said. "We saw  dolphins almost on a daily basis between June and September."
…Cornell University Prof. Chris Clark estimates that as many as 30 to 50 fin whales now live full-time in the waters just past the Verrazano Bridge.
Acoustical monitors installed by Cornell in and near the harbor discovered six species of whales touring the New York-New Jersey bite - “a real menagerie of giants,” he said.
Experts say anti-hunting laws and cleaner waters may have brought  back whales and their cousins after being largely absent for a century.
The numbers are “far, far more than expected, even for me,” Clark said. “I’ve been surprised elsewhere in the world, but off New York - yikes!”

Video from the Daily News here.
(Photo of a humpback whale in New York Harbor by Robert Sabo / New York Daily News)

New York City’s residents are again yelling “There be whales here… and seals and dolphins!”  From the Daily News:

Whales, dolphins and seals have made a triumphant return to the waters just outside New York Harbor - and the comeback has even sparked whale and seal-watching tours.

Tom Paladino, captain of two ferry boats from the Rockaways, says pods of aquatic mammals off the city’s coast have “increased tenfold.”

"We used to see 10 whales a year - now we see 100," he said. "We saw dolphins almost on a daily basis between June and September."

…Cornell University Prof. Chris Clark estimates that as many as 30 to 50 fin whales now live full-time in the waters just past the Verrazano Bridge.

Acoustical monitors installed by Cornell in and near the harbor discovered six species of whales touring the New York-New Jersey bite - “a real menagerie of giants,” he said.

Experts say anti-hunting laws and cleaner waters may have brought back whales and their cousins after being largely absent for a century.

The numbers are “far, far more than expected, even for me,” Clark said. “I’ve been surprised elsewhere in the world, but off New York - yikes!”

Video from the Daily News here.

(Photo of a humpback whale in New York Harbor by Robert Sabo / New York Daily News)