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#hurricane irene

Then-Hurricane Irene, photographed by NASA astronaut Ron Garan from aboard the International Space Station, Aug. 27.  (Photo via TwitPic)

Then-Hurricane Irene, photographed by NASA astronaut Ron Garan from aboard the International Space Station, Aug. 27.  (Photo via TwitPic)

Hurricane Irene, by the numbers, to date (UPDATE 2):

Radio news reporting that one of the Holland Tunnel’s tubes has been closed due to flooding.  The Holland runs between New Jersey and lower Manhattan I’m sure it’s not as bad as it sounds, but yikes.

My Irene news coverage contribution: minor flooding in Rockland County, with Irene’s downpours quickly coalescing into fast-moving street streams.

Clouds loomed over the New York City skyline as Hurricane Irene approached.  (Photo: Karly Domb Sadof / AP via the New York Times)

Clouds loomed over the New York City skyline as Hurricane Irene approached.  (Photo: Karly Domb Sadof / AP via the New York Times)

Houses in Coney Island posted signs. Many of the residents chose not to leave.  (Photo: Robert Stolarik / The New York Times)

Houses in Coney Island posted signs. Many of the residents chose not to leave.  (Photo: Robert Stolarik / The New York Times)

FEW YORK CITY   A man crossed an empty Times Square late on Saturday.  (Photo: Chelsea Matiash / AP via the New York Times)

FEW YORK CITY   A man crossed an empty Times Square late on Saturday.  (Photo: Chelsea Matiash / AP via the New York Times)

A little before 6 a.m. Sunday, Hurricane Irene became the third classified hurricane to make landfall in New Jersey, touching down in Atlantic County near Little Egg Inlet….

Here’s a closer look at the two that did made landfall:

The Vagabond Hurricane, 1903: The storm was named as such by The Atlantic City Press — don’t forget the naming system hasn’t always been around. It touched down with 80 mph winds on Sept. 16 and actually crossed over much of the state, tracking northwest to Trenton.

The Norfolk and Long Island Hurricane, 1821: The storm makes landfall on Sept. 3, near Cape May, bringing with it a huge storm surge on the Delaware Bay side of town, near where the Cape May-Lewis Ferry now operates. In a 2005 Star-Ledger article, state climatologist David Robinson of Rutgers University, quoting other experts, said the storm most likely made landfall with Category-3 wind speeds.

Hurricane Irene third hurricane to touch down in N.J. | NJ.com (via dendroica)