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10 years ago, some Silicon Valley types weren’t convinced Google stock would perform well.

Quotes from a New York Times story on Google’s forthcoming IPO, 6 August 2004:

  • "I’m not buying. Past experience leaves the taste that a few people — never ourselves — will make out the first day, but that it’s not likely to appreciate a lot in the near future or maybe even the long future."   — STEVE WOZNIAK, Apple co-founder
  • "I wouldn’t be buying Google stock, and I don’t know anyone who would." — JERRY KAPLAN, entrepreneur
  • "You can’t hide the fact that (Google) is slowing down.  There was a year of hyper-growth, and then it rolled over."  — ANDY KESSLER, Wall Street analyst
  • "I think Google isn’t doing what it needs to do to help the country.  For a while I thought it was an absurdist play titled ‘Waiting for Google.’ Everyone was sitting around thinking it was going to save the industry, but it’s not."  — MOSES MA, investment executive
  • "My sanity test was to ask, ‘What are the chances in the next 18 months Google’s stock price will be half of what it was on the day it went on sale?  I think there are three chances in four that will be true."  — MITCHELL KAPOR, head of the Open Source Application Foundation.

LOL.

In 1981, press secretary James Brady was wounded during an assassination attempt on president Ronald Reagan.  Brady was shot in the head and became partially paralyzed; in the years since, he became a staunch gun control advocate.

On Friday, a medical examiner ruled Brady’s death a homicide, caused by the gunshot wounds he suffered more than 33 years ago.  John Hinckley Jr., the gunman, may now be charged with murder.

(Photo: Zebowski [top] and Ron Edmonds / AP via the New York Daily News)

todaysdocument:

On July 2, 1964, with Martin Luther King, Jr., directly behind him, President Lyndon Johnson scrawled his signature on a document years in the making—the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the landmark legislation.

Civil Rights Act of 1964 , 07/02/1964

President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the 1964 Civil Rights Act as Martin Luther King, Jr., others look on, 07/02/1964. (The Lyndon Baines Johnson Presidential Library)

The first and the signature pages of the act will be on display at the National Archives Rubenstein Gallery in Washington, DC, until September 17, 2014. These 50-year-old sheets of paper represent years of struggle and society’s journey toward justice.

The most comprehensive civil rights legislation since the Reconstruction era, the Civil Right Act finally gave the Federal Government the means to enforce the promises of the 13th,  14th, and 15th Amendments. The act prohibited discrimination in public places, allowed the integration of public facilities and schools, and forbade discrimination in employment.

But such a landmark congressional enactment was by no means achieved easily…

Keep reading at Prologue: Pieces of History » Now On Display: The Civil Rights Act of 1964

Plus more on the Civil Rights Act of 1964:

Five beaches; 5,000 ships; 13,000 aircraft; 156,000 troops; Europe, freed from the grasp of tyranny. The D-Day Invasion, 70 years ago.

(Photos from top: Anthony Potter Collection / Getty Images; PhotoQuest / Getty Images; Robert Capa, Time/LIFE / AP; US Army / File via the New York Daily News)

broadcastarchive-umd:

magictransistor:

Albert Einstein with fellow physicists, engineers and scientists at the Marconi RCA Radio Station in New Brunswick, New Jersey, 1921.

From left to right: three unidentified men, David Sarnoff, Thomas J. Hayden, Ernst Julius Berg, S. Benedict, Albert Einstein, Nikola Tesla, Charles Proteus Steinmetz, A.N. Goldsmith, A. Malsin, Irving Langmuir, Albert W. Hull, E.B. Pillsbury, Saul Dushman, Richard Howland Ranger, George Ashley Campbell and two unidentified men. Some of the unidentified men might be John Carson (engineer), and Ernst Alexanderson. Others may be additional station engineers like Thomas J. Hayden who is next to Sarnoff.

"Marconi," said Einstein, "plays the mamba."

broadcastarchive-umd:

magictransistor:

Albert Einstein with fellow physicists, engineers and scientists at the Marconi RCA Radio Station in New Brunswick, New Jersey, 1921.

From left to right: three unidentified men, David Sarnoff, Thomas J. Hayden, Ernst Julius Berg, S. Benedict, Albert Einstein, Nikola Tesla, Charles Proteus Steinmetz, A.N. Goldsmith, A. Malsin, Irving Langmuir, Albert W. Hull, E.B. Pillsbury, Saul Dushman, Richard Howland Ranger, George Ashley Campbell and two unidentified men. Some of the unidentified men might be John Carson (engineer), and Ernst Alexanderson. Others may be additional station engineers like Thomas J. Hayden who is next to Sarnoff.

"Marconi," said Einstein, "plays the mamba."

Via Slate:


This document, drafted by the Montgomery Improvement Association, advised victorious bus boycotters on best practices for riding the newly integrated city bus system.




When the document was distributed on Dec. 19, 1956, the bus boycott had been going on for nearly 12 months. The MIA, headed by Martin Luther King, Jr., coordinated the boycott throughout.



As what had initially been a short-term campaign of a few days stretched into weeks and months, the MIA organized carpools and weathered bombings and legal challenges. African-American citizens walked miles to work, and marched in protest.


In June 1956, a federal district court ruled bus segregation unconstitutional; the Supreme Court affirmed the ruling in November 1956. The MIA waited until December to declare an end to the boycott, wanting to make sure that the ruling would be carried out in Montgomery. Dr. King signaled the official end of the boycott by boarding an integrated bus on Dec. 21, 1956. 





Gandhi-inspired civil rights leaders Glenn E. Smiley and Bayard Rustin advised King and the MIA during the boycott. This document shows how far the philosophy of non-violence had permeated the movement by the time of this victory.

Via Slate:

This document, drafted by the Montgomery Improvement Association, advised victorious bus boycotters on best practices for riding the newly integrated city bus system.

When the document was distributed on Dec. 19, 1956, the bus boycott had been going on for nearly 12 months. The MIA, headed by Martin Luther King, Jr., coordinated the boycott throughout.

As what had initially been a short-term campaign of a few days stretched into weeks and months, the MIA organized carpools and weathered bombings and legal challenges. African-American citizens walked miles to work, and marched in protest.

In June 1956, a federal district court ruled bus segregation unconstitutional; the Supreme Court affirmed the ruling in November 1956. The MIA waited until December to declare an end to the boycott, wanting to make sure that the ruling would be carried out in Montgomery. Dr. King signaled the official end of the boycott by boarding an integrated bus on Dec. 21, 1956. 

Gandhi-inspired civil rights leaders Glenn E. Smiley and Bayard Rustin advised King and the MIA during the boycott. This document shows how far the philosophy of non-violence had permeated the movement by the time of this victory.