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Evening News Wrap 16 December 2013.

(*Just kidding.  Photo illustration: The Atlantic)

Morning News Read 25 October 2013.

Weekend News Read 1 September 2013.

Morning News Read 22 August 2013

Morning News Read 20 August 2013

Today in Terribly Contaminated Water:

  • "Two years after a triple meltdown that grew into the world’s second worst nuclear disaster, the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant is faced with a new crisis: a flood of highly radioactive wastewater that workers are struggling to contain.”  (NY Times)
  • "Hurricane Sandy’s huge coastal floods flushed 10 billion gallons of sewage into New York and New Jersey’s waterways — and turned most of the shoreline into a filth-filled toilet for days, according to a report set to be released Tuesday. New York and New Jersey released 10 billion gallons of sewage — virtually all of the 11 billion gallons that leaked into rivers, lakes, streams and oceans between Washington, D.C. and Connecticut.” (NY Daily News)
BABY’S LAMA   Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama holds his hand up to a train window to greet a baby held by its mother at  the Koriyama railway station in northern Japan.  The Dalai Lama was there to deliver a speech to  Fukushima residents racked with the aftermath of the March 11 tsunami  and the accident at the city’s nuclear power  plant.  (Photo: Kimimasa Mayama / EPA via the Telegraph)

BABY’S LAMA   Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama holds his hand up to a train window to greet a baby held by its mother at the Koriyama railway station in northern Japan.  The Dalai Lama was there to deliver a speech to Fukushima residents racked with the aftermath of the March 11 tsunami and the accident at the city’s nuclear power plant.  (Photo: Kimimasa Mayama / EPA via the Telegraph)

Thousands of people from across  Japan, including a man and his daughter from Fukushima, attended an antinuclear rally in Tokyo on Monday.  (Photo: Yuriko Nakao / Reuters via the Wall Street Journal)

Thousands of people from across Japan, including a man and his daughter from Fukushima, attended an antinuclear rally in Tokyo on Monday.  (Photo: Yuriko Nakao / Reuters via the Wall Street Journal)

Workers at the all-but-destroyed Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan continue to face dangerous — even deadly — levels of radiation in their ongoing attempts to stabilize the plant.  Via MSNBC.com:

Pockets of lethal levels of radiation have been detected  at Japan’s crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in a reminder of the  risks faced by workers battling to contain the worst nuclear accident  since Chernobyl. 
Plant operator Tokyo Electric Power (Tepco) reported on Monday that  radiation exceeding 10 sieverts (10,000 millisieverts) per hour was  found at the bottom of a ventilation stack standing between two  reactors. 
Tepco said Tuesday it found another spot on the ventilation stack  itself where radiation exceeded 10 sieverts per hour, a level that could  lead to incapacitation or death after just several seconds of exposure.
The company used equipment to measure radiation from a distance and  was unable to ascertain the exact level because the device’s maximum  reading is 10 sieverts. 
While Tepco said the readings would not hinder its goal of  stabilizing the Fukushima reactors by January, experts warned that  worker safety could be at risk if the operator prioritized hitting the  deadline over radiation risks. 

(Handout image taken by a gamma ray camera showing the bottom of a ventilation  stack where radiation exceeding 10 sieverts per hour - seen here in red  - by TEPCO via Reuters / MSNBC.com)

Workers at the all-but-destroyed Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan continue to face dangerous — even deadly — levels of radiation in their ongoing attempts to stabilize the plant.  Via MSNBC.com:

Pockets of lethal levels of radiation have been detected at Japan’s crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in a reminder of the risks faced by workers battling to contain the worst nuclear accident since Chernobyl.

Plant operator Tokyo Electric Power (Tepco) reported on Monday that radiation exceeding 10 sieverts (10,000 millisieverts) per hour was found at the bottom of a ventilation stack standing between two reactors.

Tepco said Tuesday it found another spot on the ventilation stack itself where radiation exceeded 10 sieverts per hour, a level that could lead to incapacitation or death after just several seconds of exposure.

The company used equipment to measure radiation from a distance and was unable to ascertain the exact level because the device’s maximum reading is 10 sieverts.

While Tepco said the readings would not hinder its goal of stabilizing the Fukushima reactors by January, experts warned that worker safety could be at risk if the operator prioritized hitting the deadline over radiation risks.

(Handout image taken by a gamma ray camera showing the bottom of a ventilation stack where radiation exceeding 10 sieverts per hour - seen here in red - by TEPCO via Reuters / MSNBC.com)

Nuclear experts say new findings of highly toxic plutonium in the soil outside Japan’s beleaguered Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant show the crisis unleashed by the March 11 earthquake and tsunami is far from over.

"Minute amounts of plutonium have been detected for the first time in soil outside the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant," Japanese broadcaster NHK reported today.

Japanese researchers who analyzed roadside soil samples taken some 1.7 kilometers from the power station’s front gate on April 21 “found minute amounts of three kinds of plutonium,” NHK reported. The Japanese researchers said the quantities of plutonium found in the soil are roughly similar to that which has been found at past nuclear bomb test sites.

Plutonium is highly toxic—whether ingested or inhaled—because it emits alpha radiation “that can easily penetrate membranes inside the body,” Daryl Kimball, executive director of the Washington, D.C.-based Arms Control Association, told The Envoy.

"Plutonium Found Near Fukushima Shows Nuclear Crisis Is Far From Over" via Yahoo News