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Someone at the MTA has an excellent knack for juxtaposition.

Someone at the MTA has an excellent knack for juxtaposition.

Captain America’s been keeping a to-do list of things to see, eat and read up on ever since he was, um, defrosted.  And here is that list, in this screencap from a teaser for Captain America: The Winter Soldier.
I’m hoping he crossed off Star Wars and left on Star Trek on account of how much Star Trek is much better than Star Wars.
(via MovieWeb)

Captain America’s been keeping a to-do list of things to see, eat and read up on ever since he was, um, defrosted.  And here is that list, in this screencap from a teaser for Captain America: The Winter Soldier.

I’m hoping he crossed off Star Wars and left on Star Trek on account of how much Star Trek is much better than Star Wars.

(via MovieWeb)

moviescore:

Steven PRICE
“Gravity”
Gravity (2013)

Congratulations to composer Stephen Price, winner of the Oscar for Best Original Score, Gravity.

“My original take on this scene was a loud, late night pronouncement from Lester Bangs. A call to arms. In Phil’s hands it became something different. A scene about quiet truths shared between two guys, both at the crossroads, both hurting, and both up too late. It became the soul of the movie. In between takes, Hoffman spoke to no one. He listened only to his headset, only to the words of Lester himself. (His Walkman was filled with rare Lester interviews.) When the scene was over, I realized that Hoffman had pulled off a magic trick. He’d leapt over the words and the script, and gone hunting for the soul and compassion of the private Lester, the one only a few of us had ever met. Suddenly the portrait was complete. The crew and I will always be grateful for that front row seat to his genius.”

Director CAMERON CROWE, on a pivotal scene between the late Philip Seymour Hoffman and Patrick Fugit in Almost Famous.