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KINGS KONG   World Wildlife Foundation activists dressed as orangutans hung from  ropes near the Palace of Culture and Science in Warsaw Tuesday.  They  want to convince Poles to stop buying furniture made out of tropical  wood, which depletes natural habitats. (Photo: Kacper Pempel / Reuters via the Wall Street Journal)

KINGS KONG   World Wildlife Foundation activists dressed as orangutans hung from ropes near the Palace of Culture and Science in Warsaw Tuesday.  They want to convince Poles to stop buying furniture made out of tropical wood, which depletes natural habitats. (Photo: Kacper Pempel / Reuters via the Wall Street Journal)

CANDIDMALS   Clockwise from top left: A Macaca nemestrina (Southern pig-tailed  macaque) in Bukit Barisan Selatan, Indonesia; a Panthera Onca (Jaguar),  in central Suriname Nature Reserve; a Pan troglodytes (Common  chimpanzee) in Bwindi Impenetrable Forest, Uganda; and a giant anteater  in Manaus, Brazil - just four of almost 52,000 photos of 105 mammal  species taken as part of the first global camera trap mammal study by  The Tropical Ecology Assessment and Monitoring Network in seven  protected areas across the Americas, Africa and Asia. (Photos: The Wildlife Conservation Society via the Telegraph)

CANDIDMALS   Clockwise from top left: A Macaca nemestrina (Southern pig-tailed macaque) in Bukit Barisan Selatan, Indonesia; a Panthera Onca (Jaguar), in central Suriname Nature Reserve; a Pan troglodytes (Common chimpanzee) in Bwindi Impenetrable Forest, Uganda; and a giant anteater in Manaus, Brazil - just four of almost 52,000 photos of 105 mammal species taken as part of the first global camera trap mammal study by The Tropical Ecology Assessment and Monitoring Network in seven protected areas across the Americas, Africa and Asia. (Photos: The Wildlife Conservation Society via the Telegraph)