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A wave of protest in Hong Kong extended into the working week on Monday as thousands of residents defied a government call to abandon street blockades across the city, students boycotted classes and the city’s influential bar association added to condemnation of a police crackdown on protesters a day earlier.

The continued public resistance underscored the difficulties that the Hong Kong government faces in defusing widespread anger that erupted on Sunday, after the police used tear gas, pepper spray and batons to break up a three-day sit-in by students and other residents demanding democratic elections in the semiautonomous Chinese territory.

On Monday afternoon, the Hong Kong government canceled the city’s annual fireworks show to mark China’s National Day, which falls on Wednesday — an implicit acknowledgment that officials expect the protests to continue for days.

The police crackdown Sunday not only failed to dislodge protesters from a major thoroughfare in the heart of Hong Kong but appeared Monday to have motivated more people to join the student-led protests. A government announcement that the riot police had been withdrawn from the protest centers also seemed to open the door to growing demonstrations. The number of protesters, which had ebbed overnight, swelled again by midday Monday, as office workers in slacks and dress shirts mixed with crowds of students in black T-shirts.

Many of the new arrivals said they were angered by the police’s actions on Sunday, which they called excessive.

“This morning I was happy to see that they stayed and insisted on continuing the protest,” said Cindy Sun, a 30-year-old bank worker who joined protesters in the Admiralty district during her lunch hour.

“What they were doing was not appropriate, especially the tear gas,” she said. “The students were completely peaceful.”

Chloe Wong, 46, a mother of two, said she was inspired to join the protesters in Admiralty by the scenes of tear gas being fired the day before. She said she could find time to participate for only an hour but wanted to show her support.

“The protesters, they are so young,” she said. “They are fighting for our future, for my children’s future.”

Demonstrators were also blocking major streets in the busy shopping district of Causeway Bay and in Mongkok in Kowloon, one of the world’s most densely packed places.

Hong Kong has maintained a reputation as a safe enclave for peaceful demonstration and commerce, and the crackdown here has raised the political cost of Beijing’s unyielding position on electoral change in Hong Kong. Late last month China’s legislature called for limits on voting reforms here and barriers for candidates for the position of chief executive, the city’s top leadership post.

The New York Times, "Hong Kong Residents Defy Officials’ Call to End Protests."

How soon until China murders these protestors?

Let me get this straight: with Alibaba, we have an Internet startup that makes no tangible product with a hugely inflated IPO that was in the United States only due to a Cayman Island loophole that avoids regulations in that company’s home country (of China). Do you understand what this means?

The Communists just beat us at capitalism.

– JON STEWART, The Daily Show

TOPPLE TUESDAY  Hundreds of thousands of protestors turn out in Hong Kong to give Communist China the big fat middle finger of democracy.  (Photos of demonstrators braving torrential rains and another waving the flag of colonial Hong Kong by Dale De La Rey / AFP-Getty Images and Vincent Yu / AP via the New York Times)

The US Justice Department is charging figures linked to the Chinese military with stealing US trade secrets, in an escalation of tensions with China over economic espionage.

Suspicions about extensive corporate data theft have swirled around China for years, but never before has the US formally accused the People’s Liberation Army with criminal activity.

Last year, a report by the information security firm Mandiant concluded that a unit of the PLA, known as Unit 61398, was likely behind data theft comprising hundreds of terabytes. It found that the scale of the espionage was unlikely to have occurred without government sponsorship.

But it is unlikely that the US accusation will result in placing Chinese officials in custody, and some diplomatic risk is likely. James Lewis, a cybersecurity expert at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, said the effect would be “intangible” but the formal accusation “sends a strong message” to Beijing.

The cybercrime accusations come as the disclosures surrounding the National Security Agency indicate that at least some US surveillance redounds to America’s economic benefit.

The Guardian, "U.S. to Bring Criminal Charges Against Chinese Officials in Espionage Probe."

This should do as much as the sanctions against Russia have done in re: the Ukraine.

President Benigno S. Aquino III called on Tuesday for nations around the world to do more to support the Philippines in resisting China’s assertive claims to the seas near his country, drawing a comparison to the West’s failure to support Czechoslovakia against Hitler’s demands for Czech land in 1938.

Like Czechoslovakia, the Philippines faces demands to surrender territory piecemeal to a much stronger foreign power and needs more robust foreign support for the rule of international law if it is to resist, President Aquino said in a 90-minute interview in the wood-paneled music room of the presidential palace.

“If we say yes to something we believe is wrong now, what guarantee is there that the wrong will not be further exacerbated down the line?” he said. He later added, “At what point do you say, ‘Enough is enough’? Well, the world has to say it — remember that the Sudetenland was given in an attempt to appease Hitler to prevent World War II.”

Mr. Aquino’s remarks are among the strongest indications yet of alarm among Asian heads of state about China’s military buildup and territorial ambitions, and the second time in recent weeks that an Asian leader has volunteered a comparison to the prelude to world wars.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe of Japan caused a stir in Davos, Switzerland, when he noted last month that Britain and Germany went to war in 1914 even though they had close economic ties — much as China and Japan have now.

Japan has been locked in an increasingly tense standoff with China over uninhabited islands in the East China Sea, and even South Korea, which has been quieter about Chinese claims, expressed alarm last year when Beijing announced that it had the right to police the skies above a vast area of ocean, including areas claimed by Tokyo and Seoul.

While China’s efforts to claim rocks, shoals and fishing grounds off the coast of the Philippines in the South China Sea have been less high-profile, the Chinese have moved faster there.

The New York Times, "Philippines Leader Sounds Alarm On China."

Good for President Aquino.  The Chinese government is being a bullying motherfucker here.

BVT News Roundup 28 January 2014.

BVT News Roundup 1 January 2014.

We’re gonna need a bigger floatie.

Afternoon News Read 18 December 2013.

Evening News Read 26 November 2013.

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Afternoon News Read 13 November 2013.

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Morning News Read 30 October 2013.