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JUNK JOCKEY   With the aid of the Canadian-built DEXTRE robotic arm, U.S. astronaut Mike Fossum retrieves a failed space pump from the International Space Station to place it inside the space shuttle Atlantis’s payload bay.  The shuttle is scheduled to return to Earth at 5:56 am  EDT on Thursday, July 21.  (Photo via NASA APOD)

JUNK JOCKEY   With the aid of the Canadian-built DEXTRE robotic arm, U.S. astronaut Mike Fossum retrieves a failed space pump from the International Space Station to place it inside the space shuttle Atlantis’s payload bay.  The shuttle is scheduled to return to Earth at 5:56 am EDT on Thursday, July 21.  (Photo via NASA APOD)

CLOSER THAN THEY APPEAR    Astronaut Mike Fossum’s helmet visor mirrors a panoramic scene of the docked  International Space Station with the space shuttle Atlantis and the planet Earth below in this photo taken July 12,  2011.  (Photo: NASA via MSNBC.com)

CLOSER THAN THEY APPEAR    Astronaut Mike Fossum’s helmet visor mirrors a panoramic scene of the docked International Space Station with the space shuttle Atlantis and the planet Earth below in this photo taken July 12, 2011.  (Photo: NASA via MSNBC.com)

This is astronaut Stephen Robinson, anchored to a foot restraint on Canadarm2, attached to the International Space Station, in July 2005.  
For everyone who complains that “low-orbit” is boring - THIS IS NOT BORING.
Also?  YIKES.

This is astronaut Stephen Robinson, anchored to a foot restraint on Canadarm2, attached to the International Space Station, in July 2005. 

For everyone who complains that “low-orbit” is boring - THIS IS NOT BORING.

Also?  YIKES.

"I JUST INSTALL WINDOWS. I DON’T WASH ‘EM." American astronaut Nicholas Patrick put some finishing touches on the newly installed Tranquility module’s space windows aboard the International Space Station last week, about 340 kilometers [or 6,781,913 miles] above Earth’s surface.  “Now you can see your house from here!” Patrick jokingly told his fellow astronauts, who then refused to open the pod bay doors.  (Photo via NASA / APOD)

"I JUST INSTALL WINDOWS. I DON’T WASH ‘EM." American astronaut Nicholas Patrick put some finishing touches on the newly installed Tranquility module’s space windows aboard the International Space Station last week, about 340 kilometers [or 6,781,913 miles] above Earth’s surface.  “Now you can see your house from here!” Patrick jokingly told his fellow astronauts, who then refused to open the pod bay doors.  (Photo via NASA / APOD)