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#COMIC BOOKS

From the New York Daily News:

DC Comics is unveiling its newest super hero Wednesday — a Muslim Arab-American being interrogated by Homeland Security when he’s fitted for the cosmic powered ring. 
Meet Simon Baz of Dearborn, Mich., who grew up dealing with prejudice in a post 9/11 America. He may be unlike any other hero to make the leap to his own comic book in a single bound. 
"It’s an amalgam of a bunch of different things,” “Green Lantern” writer Geoff Johns told the Daily News. “I’m from Michigan. My dad is also Lebanese [like Baz], and there’s a very big Arab-American community there. I think he’s going to be a really great character.” 
The storyline in Wednesday’s “Green Lantern #0” issue is part the publisher’s reboot of its fictional universe last year, which wiped out more than seven decades of continuity.

From the New York Daily News:

DC Comics is unveiling its newest super hero Wednesday — a Muslim Arab-American being interrogated by Homeland Security when he’s fitted for the cosmic powered ring.

Meet Simon Baz of Dearborn, Mich., who grew up dealing with prejudice in a post 9/11 America. He may be unlike any other hero to make the leap to his own comic book in a single bound.

"It’s an amalgam of a bunch of different things,” “Green Lantern” writer Geoff Johns told the Daily News. “I’m from Michigan. My dad is also Lebanese [like Baz], and there’s a very big Arab-American community there. I think he’s going to be a really great character.”

The storyline in Wednesday’s “Green Lantern #0” issue is part the publisher’s reboot of its fictional universe last year, which wiped out more than seven decades of continuity.

Here’s a photo from the set of the Spider-Man reboot, with Los Angeles standing in for New York City and Spidey looking lean, mean, and, um, jaywalking I guess?  Whatever, they should be shooting this movie in New York.
(via Collider.com)

Here’s a photo from the set of the Spider-Man reboot, with Los Angeles standing in for New York City and Spidey looking lean, mean, and, um, jaywalking I guess?  Whatever, they should be shooting this movie in New York.

(via Collider.com)

My cable company has an ad featuring a bunch of local (well, NYC metro area) businesses that advertise with them.  This is one of them, in Port Washington, Long Island I believe.
I love their name and sign and that they still sell baseball cards.

My cable company has an ad featuring a bunch of local (well, NYC metro area) businesses that advertise with them.  This is one of them, in Port Washington, Long Island I believe.

I love their name and sign and that they still sell baseball cards.

SENIOR MINTS   These pictures show Fred Ray’s original  1942 cover artwork to Superman #14, also known as the “patriotic shield”  cover, it is widely considered to be the most valuable single piece of  original comic art still in existence; and Jerry Robinson’s original  1942 cover artwork for Detective Comics #69, known as the “double-guns  Joker” cover, it is considered to be one of the greatest Golden Age  superhero covers of all time.  (Photo: ComicConnect.com / AP via the Telegraph)

SENIOR MINTS   These pictures show Fred Ray’s original 1942 cover artwork to Superman #14, also known as the “patriotic shield” cover, it is widely considered to be the most valuable single piece of original comic art still in existence; and Jerry Robinson’s original 1942 cover artwork for Detective Comics #69, known as the “double-guns Joker” cover, it is considered to be one of the greatest Golden Age superhero covers of all time.  (Photo: ComicConnect.com / AP via the Telegraph)

Who needs superheroes when you can draw and write comic books around real-life people?  From the New York Times:

What do Jesus, Lady Gaga, J. K. Rowling, David Beckham and the cast of “Glee” have in common? They are each the subject of a biographical comic book from Bluewater Productions.
 And there are more yet to come: Carla Bruni-Sarkozy (August), Meredith Vieira (September), Olivia Newton-John (October) and the cast of “Twilight” (November). 
 Set in that middle ground between fanzines and traditional biographies  aimed at the younger reader, these publications are the latest chapter  in the publishing industry’s presentation of fact-based comics. The man  behind them all is Bluewater’s president, Darren G. Davis, and the  true-story comics have been the company’s salvation.

Who needs superheroes when you can draw and write comic books around real-life people?  From the New York Times:

What do Jesus, Lady Gaga, J. K. Rowling, David Beckham and the cast of “Glee” have in common? They are each the subject of a biographical comic book from Bluewater Productions.

And there are more yet to come: Carla Bruni-Sarkozy (August), Meredith Vieira (September), Olivia Newton-John (October) and the cast of “Twilight” (November).

Set in that middle ground between fanzines and traditional biographies aimed at the younger reader, these publications are the latest chapter in the publishing industry’s presentation of fact-based comics. The man behind them all is Bluewater’s president, Darren G. Davis, and the true-story comics have been the company’s salvation.

Today in “Things That Even Jesus H. Christ Didn’t Believe Existed, But In Fact Did Exist,” U.S. Military Edition:  "A U.S. Army comic book from 2001 explaining ‘Don’t Ask Don’t Tell,’ or  what they call (the) ‘Homosexual Conduct Policy’. The publication was very  likely as a test document with little distribution."
Like we said: Jesus H. Christ.
(via Comics With Problems and found at BoingBoing)

Today in “Things That Even Jesus H. Christ Didn’t Believe Existed, But In Fact Did Exist,” U.S. Military Edition:  "A U.S. Army comic book from 2001 explaining ‘Don’t Ask Don’t Tell,’ or what they call (the) ‘Homosexual Conduct Policy’. The publication was very likely as a test document with little distribution."

Like we said: Jesus H. Christ.

(via Comics With Problems and found at BoingBoing)