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GREAT SHOT, KID — THAT WAS ONE IN A MILLION!  NASA’s Swift satellite, Hubble Space  Telescope and Chandra X-ray Observatory joined forces to observe an unprecedented explosion: this view of GRB 110328A comprises UV, optical and x-ray images.  The blast was first detected only in X-rays over a  3.4-hour period on March 28: more than a week later,  high-energy radiation continues to brighten and fade from its location.   Astronomers say they have never seen anything this bright, long-lasting  and variable before. Usually, gamma-ray bursts mark the destruction of a  massive star, but flaring emission from these events never lasts more  than a few hours.  Although research is ongoing, astronomers say that  the unusual blast likely arose when a star wandered too close to its  galaxy’s central black hole, tearing the star apart and causing gas to continue to stream towards the hole.  Or maybe this is what it looks like when Luke destroys the Death Star.  (Photo: NASA via the Telegraph)

GREAT SHOT, KID — THAT WAS ONE IN A MILLION!  NASA’s Swift satellite, Hubble Space Telescope and Chandra X-ray Observatory joined forces to observe an unprecedented explosion: this view of GRB 110328A comprises UV, optical and x-ray images. The blast was first detected only in X-rays over a 3.4-hour period on March 28: more than a week later, high-energy radiation continues to brighten and fade from its location. Astronomers say they have never seen anything this bright, long-lasting and variable before. Usually, gamma-ray bursts mark the destruction of a massive star, but flaring emission from these events never lasts more than a few hours. Although research is ongoing, astronomers say that the unusual blast likely arose when a star wandered too close to its galaxy’s central black hole, tearing the star apart and causing gas to continue to stream towards the hole.  Or maybe this is what it looks like when Luke destroys the Death Star.  (Photo: NASA via the Telegraph)